Do It Yourself Debt Negotiation

How to Settle Your Unsecured Debt For Less Than You Owe

  • Settle your unsecured credit card debt for less than half of amount owed
  • How to avoid letting debt collectors talk you into paying much more than you owe
  • 21 sample letters you can use to negotiate debt with creditors and debt collectors
Disclaimer

The information in this section was NOT compiled by an attorney, but rather a degreed accountant, J. M. Boyd,  with years of experience working for both government and private attorneys collecting delinquent debts, taxes and other types of accounts.  The information contained in this section is to provide information on the subject of debt negotiation and should not be construed as rendering to you legal, financial or other professional advice by its author.  
Consumer Finance:  Credit, Debt, Mortgage Loans, Auto Loans, Saving Money, Building Wealth
Please recommend this site on Google Plus or Facebook
The debt negotiation and debt settlement topics discussed in this section refer to credit card debt and other types of unsecured debt such as deficiency judgments (from defaulted auto loans), medical debt, payday loans, unsecured personal loans and such.  You generally cannot negotiate secured debt, such as mortgages and car loans.  If you don't pay, the lender will foreclosure on your home or repossess your car.  And, although student loans, alimony and child support are unsecured debt, they are not negotiable.  Tax debt is negotiable sometimes.

The debt negotiation section of this website contains general information about debt negotiation  involving alternate repayment plans and reduced settlements.  Twenty one sample letters are provided as samples you can use to try and negotiate a reduced settlement regarding your unsecured debt, paying as little as 25 percent of the debt as payment in full.  To navigate this online debt settlement kit from beginning to end, click on the first link below and follow the navigation arrows located near the top right side of each page, or skip to a specific topic by clicking a link below.

Debt Negotiation -- Table of Contents

What Are Your Options Regarding Debt?
Is Debt Negotiation for You? 
Why Creditors Are Willing to Negotiate Debt
Alternate Repayment Plans
Reduced Settlements
Negotiating with Unsecured Creditors
Negotiating with Debt Collectors
Obstacles to Negotiating with Creditors / Debt Collectors
The Negative Side of Debt Negotiation
What are the Odds of Being Sued If I Don't Pay?
Make It Harder for Creditors to Sue You
What Settlement Amount Should I Offer?
Negotiating Medical Debt
Negotiating Credit Card Debt
Negotiating Tax Debt

21 Sample Debt Negotiation Letters Addressed to Creditors and Debt Collectors:

Letter 1:  To Creditor: Request a Temporary Payment Reduction
Letter 2:  To Creditor: Request a Proportional Payment Schedule
Letter 3:  To Creditor: Request a Reduced Settlement
Letter 4:  To Debt Collector:  Debt Settlement Letter
Letter 5:  To Creditor: Request Temporary Payment Suspension
Letter 6:  To Debt Collector: Propose Payment Schedule 1
Letter 6a: To Debt Collector:  Propose Payment Schedule 2
Letter 7:  To Creditor: Request a Lower Interest Rate to Ease Debt Load
Letter 8: To Debt Collector:  Stop Harassing Me!
Letter 8a: To Debt Collector:  Cease All Contact
Letter 8b: To Debt Collector:  Failure to Contact Attorney
Letter 8c: To Debt Collector:  Contact at Inappropriate Time
Letter 8d: To Debt Collector:   Illegal Contact by Post Card
Letter 8e: To Debt Collector:   Stop Contacting Me At Work
Letter 8f: To Debt Collector:   Requested a Post-dated Check
Letter 8g: To Debt Collector:  Cease Abusive Conduct
Letter 8h: To Debt Collector:  Unauthorized Disclosures to Third Party
Letter 9: To Debt Collector:  Don't Owe Debt (First Letter)
Letter 9a: To Debt Collector:  Don't Owe Debt (Second Letter)
Letter 9b: To Debt Collector:  Dispute Validity of Debt
Letter 10:  Report Debt Collector to FTC